VCP – Birth to 8 years old

Birth-8

Vernon School Readiness Council (VSRC)

Mission: To ensure that every child in Vernon starts school ready to learn.

The Vernon School Readiness Council is a collaborative group of Community members, educators, and providers who are interested in the well-being of children. This Council oversees the work of the Birth-8 section of the Vernon Community plan. Go to www.VernonSchoolReadiness.org for more information about the VSRC. You can also like them on Facebook.

The Vernon School Readiness has sub committees focused on specific age groups within birth-8 and are guided by the Community Plan.

Sub committees:

Prenatal, Infant, Toddler – Community of Practice

Mission: To Help parents and providers raise safe healthy and productive children by providing services, support and trainings
Providers and community members who work with children and families with in this age range are members of this group.

They organize a number of professional development opportunities for the community and are currently organizing infant mental health training which will take place in March.

This group also runs the annual “Ready Set Baby Fair” in September for families in our community who have or are soon expecting to have an infant or toddler. The fair is filled with information from Community providers about resources and programs for very young children.

 

Preschool – Community of Practice

Mission: To assist parents, guardians and providers in enhancing their children’s development and social-emotional well-being by aligning practices through a meaningful collaboration between school, community and family.
This group consists of members who work with preschool age children and their families.
They focus on identifying and aligning program practices which promote high quality environments as well as smooth transitions for children in to kindergarten.

 

School Age – Community of Practice

Mission: To assist parents, guardians, and providers in enhancing their children’s mental health, educational, and enrichment well-being by strengthening a comprehensive and meaningful collaboration between school, community and family.
This group includes providers who serve school age children and their families.
Two current areas of focus for this group include the prevention of summer learning loss and developing resources to help adults and caregivers outside of school support children’s homework success.


What we’re measuring!

• Prenatal Care
• Babies Born at Low Birth Weight
C. WHAT CAN WE DO?
In order to have a positive effect on the rate of non-adequate prenatal care and corresponding low birth weight of babies, it is important to reach these women pre-pregnancy or in their first trimester. This will take an effort by the Vernon community that builds on existing programs and services while introducing innovative approaches.

13 1. Additional data collection and analysis on non-adequate prenatal care and low birth weight as they relate to race and ethnicity, age of mother, and mother’s level of education. Implementation Coordinator Received latest available state data on prenatal care available from DPH (2009). Data shows that in 2009, 72 out of 342 women who gave birth in Vernon received non adequate prenatal care. (21%) as compared to 22.7 % in 2008. 48 of the 72 women not receiving adequate prenatal care initiated care in the first trimester, but did not follow through with the recommended number of Dr’s appointments. which tells us that those 48 women may have had some barriers to making regular Dr.s appointments. More recent WIC data collected on a monthly basis for families who enroll show most women are getting adequate prenatal care. Earliest available data is 2009. Obtaining recent, disaggregated data is a challenge.
Data is based on definition of Non –adequate prenatal care that includes timing of initiation of dr’s appointment and number of appointments. This limited definition does not give us much information or explaining the “why.”

13 2. Explore opportunities for expanding home visitation services in Vernon.

a) Research Child First (Bridgeport) to assess opportunity for replication locally.

b) Assess the possibility of expanding Nurturing Families outreach efforts
YSB Director/ ECHN Discussed NFN expansion with ECHN – not possible due to lack of funding from DCF. Met with ED of KIDSAFE CT regarding expansion of its home visiting program. Funding request for
Expansion in HFPG application has been granted. KIDSAFE Ct is currently accepting referrals for families in the Vernon Community who have a need for assistance. Federal grant awarded to Vernon/Manchester to expand Parents As Trainer curriculum via , Miechv home visiting program HFFPG- KIDSAFE
Federal Money- received by ECHN

13 3. Create a multi-pronged approach to raising awareness on the importance of adequate prenatal care.

a) Meet with Rockville High School Health teachers to discuss curriculum expansion.
Implementation Coordinator Met with Health Director Vernon Public Schools to discuss adding information on the importance of adequate prenatal care to the mandatory health curriculum. He recommended the best opportunity for additions would be in 2014 when changes to the curriculum are scheduled to happen. VPS staff changes occurred, new conversation required. Started conversation with administrator Lois Possell, follow up needed.
b) Connect with local pharmacies for planned display of informational materials.
Strategic Communications Local pharmacies directed to Community relations department in Corporate offices. Despite several attempts, did not reach anyone to allow permission in Corporate office.
c) Expand scope and eligibility for community baby showers to include all income levels.
Prenatal Infant and Toddler COP Held Community Baby shower at Talcott Park in 2012, 1013, and 2014 for all Vernon families who were expecting a baby and/or have infants and toddlers, Have had between 86 and 90 participants an average of 20 exhibitors attend each year. Information including each participant’s name, address, and prenatal care experience was collected.
d) Enhance use of existing media such as organizational websites and community newspapers.

e) Identify and train peer/adult mentors to serve as neighborhood resources.
RCA Currently have 6 neighborhood advocates
f) Include prenatal care booths and vendors in Vernon Holistic Fair.
Strategic Communications Planning for 2014

DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA (DDA) – Childhood Obesity
Healthcare practitioners define obesity in different ways. The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin recently stated that the most common thing that physicians and other clinicians use is the BMI (Body Mass Index), the relationship between height and weight. She noted, however, that someone could have a BMI that is outside of the range and still be perfectly healthy. Given this discrepancy, most people are starting to move to the percentage of body fat as a much better indicator, according to Dr. Benjamin. Ways in which to do this comprehensively are being explored. Further, some family physicians who see the entire family, women and children, have raised a concern about the lack of specific guidelines that would help them in their working with childhood obesity.

In order to combat chronic disease, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is in the process of creating “Connecticut’s Plan for Heart Healthy, Smoke Free, & Physically Fit Communities 2011-2016”. This plan offers insight in the chronic health issue of childhood obesity. The Vernon Public School Wellness Committee will serve as the link to this statewide planning process and its local implementation.
Vernon Public School Wellness Committee

• Child Abuse and Neglect
• Risk Factors Associated with Child Abuse & Neglect
Children Living with Single Parent
Children Living below Poverty Level
The Vernon Community Network and Vernon School Readiness Council agree that a coordinated approach involving local, regional and state partnerships is most effective in addressing issues of abuse and neglect.
The following proposed strategies implemented locally, will make a difference for children Birth to 8 who are suffering and/or at risk of abuse and neglect.

18 1. Develop a coordinated system of response for identified families.

a) Establish a Child Advocacy Team (CAT), to create a collaborative approach to aid and assist families with complex service needs.
Implementation coordinator HFPG funding secured in Year 2 to implement CAT, which was re- established Spring of 2014. Currently accepting referrals.
• Assess opportunity to redeploy existing resources
VSRC discussion about forming a Community of practice for home visitation programs. time: Current home visiting practitioners meet in the existing Cop’s (infant toddler, preschool, and school age)
• Seek new funding

b) Capture historical (situational) responses of Vernon Community Network to date to map future responses.
Individual needs historically have been communicated to the VCN president who puts out email ned and request to VCN members.
c) Reduce barriers to participation in existing parent education programs.

d) Implement mentoring programs, based on the Parent-Aide model, a system for long-term commitment to families who exhibit the risk factors connected with child abuse and neglect.

e) Expand Nurturing Families Network screening and services in order to identify all families who present with risk factors for abuse and neglect and connect them with services.

YSB Director Meeting held with ECHN Family Development Center Director and NFN Coordinator NFN cannot expand service due to DCF contract definitions of client population to be served

2. Increase the capacity of the Vernon Community Network and its members to better meet the needs of children and families.

a) Conduct Asset Mapping of Vernon Community Network – individual, group and community members

• Host a Vernon Community Network Agency Fair – increasing awareness of existing services and resources
Done Spring 2013 internally at June meeting.
Fall2014, Provider fair organized by VPS staff on staff development day held on November 5th .
• Make targeted linkages by connecting community needs to the appropriate VCN provider or organization.
This is established for needs of food, clothing, and shelter via Cornerstone, Tritown shelter, Spanish church food pantry, and HVCC.

b) Create a coordinated calendar of training and technical assistance opportunities throughout the community.
Professional development training for birth -8 providers occurs regularly throughout the year through the Vernon School Readiness Council CoP committees.
• Program Performance and Accountability

% of trained volunteers that have increased ability to mentor others.

% of VCN members who report using acquired capacity-building skills in their work environment.

% of VCN members who adopt a common screening tool.

# of community volunteers who register for mentor training.

# of VCN members who attend capacity-building sessions.

Preschool Experience
At the present time, the following two systems are recognized nationally as being indicative of meeting the definition of high quality: 1) Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and 2) Head Start Performance Standards. It is intended that the Vernon School Readiness Council’s Vernon Early Childhood Community of Practice, in addition to implementing these national systems, take the following actions:
In order to move the high quality early childhood agenda forward, two critical issues must be addressed. First, those involved must come to an agreement about what defines a program as being high quality, and secondly, how do we work collaboratively to help each program meet this definition. Can we identify and create pathways and resources to help programs meet these standards?

23 1. Develop community based-quality standards (e.g. Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators) that all preschool programs could work towards.

a) Expand VECCoP Membership to include all preschool providers in Vernon.
All Center based providers are members of CoP, with the exception of Talcotville Nursery school, however the number of Center based community providers has decreased significantly over the past 2 years due to low enrollment and increased competition, moving from 6 in 2013 to currently 4 members.
b) Examine existing quality standards.
Quality standards are on the agenda of each CoP meeting and include discussions on how to increase family engagement and address social, emotional, and behavioral needs of children.
c) Assess current standards and practices at the centers in Vernon.
VSRC executive committee currently discussing the possibility of expanding program monitoring of the birth to 8 coordinator to add community based programs to the list of sites that are monitored. Currently monitoring only happens at sites which operate school readiness slots.
d) Adopt quality indicators.
VECCOP Have identified 2
*Use a common screening tool for all children ESI, or ages and stages
*Intentionally teaching and strengthening social and emotional skills.
Ages and stages is being used by CoP members Implementing identified indicators requires decision makers to be at the CoP meetings. CoP members are typically the practitioners or “teachers.” Teachers do not always have the authority to purchase materials or make decisions about program implementation.
e) Share with the community to raise awareness of quality standards.
VECCOP Waiting on development of standards

23 2. Provide coaching and other supports to programs while they work to attain and maintain these standards.
VECCOP “
a) Create Coaching job descriptions, qualifications.

b) Establish volunteer participation guidelines for providers.

c) Create a benefit program and assessment procedure for centers needing access to financial support.

d) Create Resource binders for participating programs/centers

# of preschool programs that participate in the development of agreed upon quality standards for Vernon.

# of preschool programs that implement the standards.
% of preschool programs that increase quality standards based on coaching and other supports provided.

% of preschool programs that meet high quality criteria of as defined by the Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators.

% of kindergarteners who attend a quality preschool as defined by Vernon Early Childhood Quality Standards.

• 3rd Grade CMT Reading

• 3rd Grade Reading CMT Scores by School

Children entering kindergarten in the Vernon Public Schools bring a variety of background and preparation with them. There is a wide disparity in the socio-economic status of the families in Vernon (an average poverty rate of 46% in our elementary schools) and that appears to influence the experiences each child has prior to entering school. In addition to a wide range of vocabulary acquisition, there is a wide range of contextual experiences for each child. While we live near farmland, many of our children have never seen a cow. We are relatively near the ocean and some of our children do not have the experience of a day at the beach. Some children do not have home libraries or visit our public library with regularity. In addition, the preschool experiences that our children have are varied in quality.

27 1. Provide opportunities for preschool children to be exposed to and interact with text and to contextually increase their vocabulary acquisition and background knowledge

a) Ensure that every child has access to a high quality preschool experience.
Starting in the fall of 2012, 15 school readiness slots were added to Northeast School preschool program. An additional 30 were added in fall of 2014 Ready Set School Fair provides info and connects parents to early education programs. Decision to make this an annual event needs to be made. Funding for Ready Set School Fair
b) Ensure that all children have access to text – put books into the hands and homes of children.
Summer Book Mobile gave out 2741 books this summer. Project Coordinator will continue to look for opportunities to get books to children by reaching out to home providers and partnering with the library to deliver books and literacy materials to their homes.
c) Provide varied opportunities for children to engage in experiences which expand their background knowledge and vocabulary.
VSRC contracted with Lutz to provide free summer learning opportunities throughout Vernon during the summer. 7 programs were held.
Enrichment programs such as girls scouts and healthy eating demonstrations, and arts and crafts through ECHN FRC held at free summer lunch sites.

27 2. Provide a guaranteed viable curriculum, delivered through high quality instruction and ensured through a variety of assessments, to which every student has access and multiple opportunities to achieve.
VPS
a) Develop and Implement a reading and language arts curriculum based on national and state standards.
VPS
b) Provide opportunities for teachers to develop and expand their instructional practices.
VPS
c) Differentiate instruction for each learner to ensure that every student has access to the curriculum.
VPS
d) Develop and implement common assessments that measure student achievement of the curriculum and report the results.
VPS

Added to Plan in MH’s Report, date?
N/A STRATEGY3: Develop a coordinated community wide strategies to address the areas that have been proven to affect grade level reading: summer learning loss, school attendance, and school readiness
Provide children with summer reading opportunities by expanding the services of the Summer Book Mobile, which began in 2011.
VSRC Project Coordinator Summer 2012 Book Mobile increased number of stops to include more Vernon neighborhoods and town summer youth programs. Distribution of books increased from 741, in 2011 to over 2700 in summer of 2014. Have increased number of books distributed each year. Have created on site libraries for Park and rec programs. Storage of books on off season, storage and display of books inside the bus is challenging.
Will purchase leveled book system for summer of 2015
Work with the BOE to obtain information on summer learning goals in a user friendly manner that can be shared with all families and summer program providers. Reading throughout the summer is important. This is the common message shared to and by summer providers. The summer learning work group organized training opportunities for community providers on how to promote literacy through specific practices. The Rockville Library worked in collaboration with the schools in 2013 and 2014 to operate summer learning program at 2 elementary schools who were moderately at risk for summer reading loss. The program grew from 7 the first year to 17 the following year.
Join National Campaign for Grade Level Reading to obtain resources and information on best practices to address School Attendance, summer learning loss, and School readiness VSRC Joined campaign.
VSRC members have access to NING GRL website
Creating Family Awareness on the importance of reading by looking for continual opportunities to inform parents about the importance of their role in early literacy Distributed 228 reading guides for families at a variety of events including 5 Elementary School Open Houses in 2012 and at Ready Set school fair and Ready Set Baby Fair.

• How much did we do?

# of varied preschool offerings that ensures access to high quality preschool for every child.

# of preschool providers that regularly reviews and implements pre-literacy skills.

# of books in the hands of every child at regular intervals from birth to age 5.

# of varied opportunities for young children to expand their world and build their vocabulary and background knowledge.

# of complete reading curriculum in the hands of every teacher.

# of common assessments.

• How well did we do it?

D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?
% of books delivered to children birth to five that are read.

% of preschool children with varied opportunities for outside learning.

% of local reading/language arts curriculum implemented with fidelity.

% of kindergarten students at low risk in letter naming fluency, letter sound fluency, and phoneme segmentation on fall universal screening assessments.

% of kindergarten students reading at least at the state goal (Level 4 = Level C in Vernon) at the end of kindergarten.

% of students reading at/above goal at each grade level.

• Is anyone better off?

% of children who are assessed ready to learn at kindergarten entry.
85%-90% of all children will read at least the state goal at the end of kindergarten.
100% of children will read on grade level by the end of grade 3.

 

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P INITIATIVE/TASK ASSIGNED TO STATUS/DATE Barriers Payment Source
A Strategies Person Responsible Progress to Date
G
E

• Prenatal Care
• Babies Born at Low Birth Weight
C. WHAT CAN WE DO?
In order to have a positive effect on the rate of non-adequate prenatal care and corresponding low birth weight of babies, it is important to reach these women pre-pregnancy or in their first trimester. This will take an effort by the Vernon community that builds on existing programs and services while introducing innovative approaches.

13 1. Additional data collection and analysis on non-adequate prenatal care and low birth weight as they relate to race and ethnicity, age of mother, and mother’s level of education. Implementation Coordinator Received latest available state data on prenatal care available from DPH (2009). Data shows that in 2009, 72 out of 342 women who gave birth in Vernon received non adequate prenatal care. (21%) as compared to 22.7 % in 2008. 48 of the 72 women not receiving adequate prenatal care initiated care in the first trimester, but did not follow through with the recommended number of Dr’s appointments. which tells us that those 48 women may have had some barriers to making regular Dr.s appointments. More recent WIC data collected on a monthly basis for families who enroll show most women are getting adequate prenatal care. Earliest available data is 2009. Obtaining recent, disaggregated data is a challenge.
Data is based on definition of Non –adequate prenatal care that includes timing of initiation of dr’s appointment and number of appointments. This limited definition does not give us much information or explaining the “why.”

13  2. Explore opportunities for expanding home visitation services in Vernon.

a) Research Child First (Bridgeport) to assess opportunity for replication locally.

b) Assess the possibility of expanding Nurturing Families outreach efforts YSB Director/ ECHN Discussed NFN expansion with ECHN – not possible due to lack of funding from DCF. Met with ED of KIDSAFE CT regarding expansion of its home visiting program. Funding request for HFFPG- KIDSAFE
Expansion in HFPG application has been granted. KIDSAFE Ct is currently accepting referrals for families in the Vernon Community who have a need for assistance. Federal grant awarded to Vernon/Manchester to expand Parents As Trainer curriculum via , Miechv home visiting program Federal Money- received by ECHN

13  3. Create a multi-pronged approach to raising awareness on the importance of adequate prenatal care.

a) Meet with Rockville High School Health teachers to discuss curriculum expansion. Implementation Coordinator Met with Health Director Vernon Public Schools to discuss adding information on the importance of adequate prenatal care to the mandatory health curriculum. He recommended the best opportunity for additions would be in 2014 when changes to the curriculum are scheduled to happen. VPS staff changes occurred, new conversation required. Started conversation with administrator Lois Possell, follow up needed.

b) Connect with local pharmacies for planned display of informational materials. Strategic Communications Local pharmacies directed to Community relations department in Corporate offices. Despite several attempts, did not reach anyone to allow permission in Corporate office.

c) Expand scope and eligibility for community baby showers to include all income levels. Prenatal Infant and Toddler COP Held Community Baby shower at Talcott Park in 2012, 1013, and 2014 for all Vernon families who were expecting a baby and/or have infants and toddlers, Have had between 86 and 90 participants an average of 20 exhibitors attend each year. Information including each participant’s name, address, and prenatal care experience was collected.

d) Enhance use of existing media such as organizational websites and community newspapers.

e) Identify and train peer/adult mentors to serve as neighborhood resources. RCA Currently have 6 neighborhood advocates

f) Include prenatal care booths and vendors in Vernon Holistic Fair. Strategic Communications Planning for 2014

DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA (DDA) – Childhood Obesity
Healthcare practitioners define obesity in different ways. The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin recently stated that the most common thing that physicians and other clinicians use is the BMI (Body Mass Index), the relationship between height and weight. She noted, however, that someone could have a BMI that is outside of the range and still be perfectly healthy. Given this discrepancy, most people are starting to move to the percentage of body fat as a much better indicator, according to Dr. Benjamin. Ways in which to do this comprehensively are being explored. Further, some family physicians who see the entire family, women and children, have raised a concern about the lack of specific guidelines that would help them in their working with childhood obesity.

In order to combat chronic disease, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is in the process of creating  “Connecticut’s Plan for Heart Healthy, Smoke Free, & Physically Fit Communities 2011-2016”. This plan offers insight in the chronic health issue of childhood obesity. The Vernon Public School Wellness Committee will serve as the link to this statewide planning process and its local implementation. Vernon Public School Wellness Committee

• Child Abuse and Neglect
• Risk Factors Associated with Child Abuse & Neglect
Children Living with Single Parent
Children Living below Poverty Level
The Vernon Community Network and Vernon School Readiness Council agree that a coordinated approach involving local, regional and state partnerships is most effective in addressing issues of abuse and neglect.
The following proposed strategies implemented locally, will make a difference for children Birth to 8 who are suffering and/or at risk of abuse and neglect.

18  1. Develop a coordinated system of response for identified families.

a) Establish a Child Advocacy Team (CAT), to create a collaborative approach to aid and assist families with complex service needs. Implementation coordinator HFPG funding secured in Year 2 to implement CAT, which was re- established Spring of 2014. Currently accepting referrals.

• Assess opportunity to redeploy existing resources VSRC discussion about forming a Community of practice for home visitation programs. time: Current home visiting practitioners meet in the existing Cop’s (infant toddler, preschool, and school age)

• Seek new funding

b) Capture historical (situational) responses of Vernon Community Network to date to map future responses. Individual needs historically have been communicated to the VCN president who puts out email ned and request to VCN members.

c) Reduce barriers to participation in existing parent education programs.

d) Implement mentoring programs, based on the Parent-Aide model, a system for long-term commitment to families who exhibit the risk factors connected with child abuse and neglect.

e) Expand Nurturing Families Network screening and services in order to identify all families who present with risk factors for abuse and neglect and connect them with services. YSB Director Meeting held with ECHN Family Development Center Director and NFN Coordinator NFN cannot expand service due to DCF contract definitions of client population to be served

2. Increase the capacity of the Vernon Community Network and its members to better meet the needs of children and families.

a) Conduct Asset Mapping of Vernon Community Network – individual, group and community members

• Host a Vernon Community Network Agency Fair – increasing awareness of existing services and resources Done Spring 2013 internally at June meeting.
Fall2014, Provider fair organized by VPS staff on staff development day held on November 5th .
• Make targeted linkages by connecting community needs to the appropriate VCN provider or organization. This is established for needs of food, clothing, and shelter via Cornerstone, Tritown shelter, Spanish church food pantry, and HVCC.

b) Create a coordinated calendar of training and technical assistance opportunities throughout the community. Professional development training for birth -8 providers occurs regularly throughout the year through the Vernon School Readiness Council CoP committees.

• Program Performance and Accountability

% of trained volunteers that have increased ability to mentor others.

% of VCN members who report using acquired capacity-building skills in their work environment.

% of VCN members who adopt a common screening tool.

# of community volunteers who register for mentor training.

# of VCN members who attend capacity-building sessions.

Preschool Experience
At the present time, the following two systems are recognized nationally as being indicative of meeting the definition of high quality: 1) Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and 2) Head Start Performance Standards. It is intended that the Vernon School Readiness Council’s Vernon Early Childhood Community of Practice, in addition to implementing these national systems, take the following actions:
In order to move the high quality early childhood agenda forward, two critical issues must be addressed. First, those involved must come to an agreement about what defines a program as being high quality, and secondly, how do we work collaboratively to help each program meet this definition. Can we identify and create pathways and resources to help programs meet these standards?

23 1.     Develop community based-quality standards (e.g. Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators) that all preschool programs could work towards.

a) Expand VECCoP Membership to include all preschool providers in Vernon. All Center based providers are members of CoP, with the exception of Talcotville Nursery school, however the number of Center based community providers has decreased significantly over the past 2 years due to low enrollment and increased competition, moving from 6 in 2013 to currently 4 members.

b) Examine existing quality standards. Quality standards are on the agenda of each CoP meeting and include discussions on how to increase family engagement and address social, emotional, and behavioral needs of children.

c) Assess current standards and practices at the centers in Vernon. VSRC executive committee currently discussing the possibility of expanding program monitoring of the birth to 8 coordinator to add community based programs to the list of sites that are monitored. Currently monitoring only happens at sites which operate school readiness slots.

d) Adopt quality indicators. VECCOP Have identified 2 Implementing identified indicators requires decision makers to be at the CoP meetings. CoP members are typically the practitioners or “teachers.” Teachers do not always have the authority to purchase materials or make decisions about program implementation.
*Use a common screening tool for all children ESI, or ages and stages
*Intentionally teaching and strengthening social and emotional skills.
Ages and stages is being used by CoP members
e) Share with the community to raise awareness of quality standards. VECCOP Waiting on development of standards

23 2. Provide coaching and other supports to programs while they work to attain and maintain these standards. VECCOP “

a) Create Coaching job descriptions, qualifications. “

b) Establish volunteer participation guidelines for providers. “

c) Create a benefit program and assessment procedure for centers needing access to financial support. “

d) Create Resource binders for participating programs/centers “

# of preschool programs that participate in the development of agreed upon quality standards for Vernon.

# of preschool programs that implement the standards.
% of preschool programs that increase quality standards based on coaching and other supports provided.

% of preschool programs that meet high quality criteria of as defined by the Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators.

% of kindergarteners who attend a quality preschool as defined by Vernon Early Childhood Quality Standards.

• 3rd Grade CMT Reading

• 3rd Grade Reading CMT Scores by School

Children entering kindergarten in the Vernon Public Schools bring a variety of background and preparation with them. There is a wide disparity in the socio-economic status of the families in Vernon (an average poverty rate of 46% in our elementary schools) and that appears to influence the experiences each child has prior to entering school. In addition to a wide range of vocabulary acquisition, there is a wide range of contextual experiences for each child. While we live near farmland, many of our children have never seen a cow. We are relatively near the ocean and some of our children do not have the experience of a day at the beach. Some children do not have home libraries or visit our public library with regularity. In addition, the preschool experiences that our children have are varied in quality.

27 1. Provide opportunities for preschool children to be exposed to and interact with text and to contextually increase their vocabulary acquisition and background knowledge

a) Ensure that every child has access to a high quality preschool experience. Starting in the fall of 2012, 15 school readiness slots were added to Northeast School preschool program. An additional 30 were added in fall of 2014 Ready Set School Fair provides info and connects parents to early education programs. Decision to make this an annual event needs to be made. Funding for Ready Set School Fair

b) Ensure that all children have access to text – put books into the hands and homes of children. Summer Book Mobile gave out 2741 books this summer. Project Coordinator will continue to look for opportunities to get books to children by reaching out to home providers and partnering with the library to deliver books and literacy materials to their homes.

c) Provide varied opportunities for children to engage in experiences which expand their background knowledge and vocabulary. VSRC contracted with Lutz to provide free summer learning opportunities throughout Vernon during the summer. 7 programs were held.
Enrichment programs such as girls scouts and healthy eating demonstrations, and arts and crafts through ECHN FRC held at free summer lunch sites.

27 2. Provide a guaranteed viable curriculum, delivered through high quality instruction and ensured through a variety of assessments, to which every student has access and multiple opportunities to achieve. VPS

a) Develop and Implement a reading and language arts curriculum based on national and state standards. VPS

b) Provide opportunities for teachers to develop and expand their instructional practices. VPS

c) Differentiate instruction for each learner to ensure that every student has access to the curriculum. VPS

d) Develop and implement common assessments that measure student achievement of the curriculum and report the results. VPS

Added to Plan in MH’s Report, date?
N/A STRATEGY3: Develop a coordinated community wide strategies to address the areas that have been proven to affect grade level reading: summer learning loss, school attendance, and school readiness
Provide children with summer reading opportunities by expanding the services of the Summer Book Mobile, which began in 2011. VSRC Project Coordinator Summer 2012 Book Mobile increased number of stops to include more Vernon neighborhoods and town summer youth programs. Distribution of books increased from 741, in 2011 to over 2700 in summer of 2014. Have increased number of books distributed each year. Have created on site libraries for Park and rec programs. Storage of books on off season, storage and display of books inside the bus is challenging.
Will purchase leveled book system for summer of 2015
Work with the BOE to obtain information on summer learning goals in a user friendly manner that can be shared with all families and summer program providers. Reading throughout the summer is important. This is the common message shared to and by summer providers. The summer learning work group organized training opportunities for community providers on how to promote literacy through specific practices. The Rockville Library worked in collaboration with the schools in 2013 and 2014 to operate summer learning program at 2 elementary schools who were moderately at risk for summer reading loss. The program grew from 7 the first year to 17 the following year.
Join National Campaign for Grade Level Reading to obtain resources and information on best practices to address School Attendance, summer learning loss, and School readiness VSRC Joined campaign.
VSRC members have access to NING GRL website
Creating Family Awareness on the importance of reading by looking for continual opportunities to inform parents about the importance of their role in early literacy Distributed 228 reading guides for families at a variety of events including 5 Elementary School Open Houses in 2012 and at Ready Set school fair and Ready Set Baby Fair.

• How much did we do?

# of varied preschool offerings that ensures access to high quality preschool for every child.

# of preschool providers that regularly reviews and implements pre-literacy skills.

# of books in the hands of every child at regular intervals from birth to age 5.

# of varied opportunities for young children to expand their world and build their vocabulary and background knowledge.

# of complete reading curriculum in the hands of every teacher.

# of common assessments.

• How well did we do it?

D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?
% of books delivered to children birth to five that are read.

% of preschool children with varied opportunities for outside learning.

% of local reading/language arts curriculum implemented with fidelity.

% of kindergarten students at low risk in letter naming fluency, letter sound fluency, and phoneme segmentation on fall universal screening assessments.

% of kindergarten students reading at least at the state goal (Level 4 = Level C in Vernon) at the end of kindergarten.

% of students reading at/above goal at each grade level.

• Is anyone better off?

% of children who are assessed ready to learn at kindergarten entry.
85%-90% of all children will read at least the state goal at the end of kindergarten.
100% of children will read on grade level by the end of grade 3.